Video Spotlight

"'I'm a Health Worker' - Abduaraman Gidi" made by IntraHealth International.

Female Health Workers at the Doorstep: A Pilot of Community-Based Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Service Delivery in Northern Nigeria

Deployment of resident female Community Health Extension Workers (CHEWs) to a remote rural community led to major and sustained increases in service utilization, including antenatal care and facility-based deliveries. 

Key components for success include:
1) providing an additional rural residence allowance to help recruit and retain CHEWs;
2) posting the female CHEWs in pairs to avoid isolation and provide mutual support;
3) ensuring supplies and transportation means for home visits; and
4) allowing CHEWs to perform deliveries.
 

CHW Home Visit: Malaria Case (video)

In this video, community health workers partake in a home visit for a case of malaria. 

The effectiveness of Technology-assisted Cascade Training and Supervision of community health workers in delivering the Thinking Healthy Program for perinatal depression in a post-conflict area of Pakistan: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Rates of perinatal depression in low and middle-income countries are reported to be very high. Perinatal depression not only has a profound impact on women’s health, disability and functioning, it is associated with poor child health outcomes such as pre-term birth, under-nutrition, and stunting, which ultimately have an adverse trans-generational impact. There is strong evidence in the medical literature that perinatal depression can be effectively managed with psychological treatments delivered by non-specialists.

Shifting management of a community volunteer system for improved child health outcomes: results from an operations research study in Burundi

Community-based strategies that foster frequent contact between caregivers of children under five and provide credible sources of health information are essential to improve child survival. Care Groups are a community-based implementation strategy for the delivery of social and behavior change interventions. This study assessed if supervision of Care Group activities by Ministry of Health (MOH) personnel could achieve the same child health outcomes as supervision provided by specialized non-governmental organization (NGO) staff. 

Raising the Score: Community empowerment for better maternal health care

Community empowerment for better maternal health care

Learn about the approach CARE has implemented to address community concerns and 
improve maternal health in Malawi.

This is an interactive website with multimedia content. 

Estimating the cost of referral and willingness to pay for referral to higher-level health facilities: a case series study from an integrated community case management programme in Uganda

Integrated community case management (iCCM) relies on community health workers (CHWs) managing children with malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea, and referring children when management is not possible. This study sought to establish the cost per sick child referred to seek care from a higher-level health facility by a CHW and to estimate caregivers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for a referral. 

​Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource- Contstrained Settings

Care Group projects resulted in high levels of healthy behavior, including use of oral rehydration therapy, bed nets, and health care services. Accordingly, under-5 mortality in Care Groups areas declined by an estimated 32% compared with 11% in areas with child survival projects not using Core Groups.

 

Care Groups I: An Innovative Community-Based Strategy for Improving Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health in Resource-Constrained Settings

Care Groups use volunteers to motivate mothers to adopt key MCH behaviors. The volunteers meet as a group every 2-4 weeks with a paid facilitator to learn new health promotion messages. Key ingredients of the approach include: peer-to-peer health promotion, selection of volunteers by the mothers, a manageable workload for the volunteers (no more than 15 households per volunteer), frequent (at least monthly) contact between volunteers and mothers, and regular supervision of the volunteers. 

 

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