Video Spotlight

"'I'm a Health Worker' - Abduaraman Gidi" made by IntraHealth International.

Raising the Score: Community empowerment for better maternal health care

Community empowerment for better maternal health care

Learn about the approach CARE has implemented to address community concerns and 
improve maternal health in Malawi.

This is an interactive website with multimedia content. 

Estimating the cost of referral and willingness to pay for referral to higher-level health facilities: a case series study from an integrated community case management programme in Uganda

Integrated community case management (iCCM) relies on community health workers (CHWs) managing children with malaria, pneumonia, diarrhoea, and referring children when management is not possible. This study sought to establish the cost per sick child referred to seek care from a higher-level health facility by a CHW and to estimate caregivers’ willingness to pay (WTP) for a referral. 

​Care Groups II: A Summary of the Child Survival Outcomes Achieved using Volunteer Community Health Workers in Resource- Contstrained Settings

Care Group projects resulted in high levels of healthy behavior, including use of oral rehydration therapy, bed nets, and health care services. Accordingly, under-5 mortality in Care Groups areas declined by an estimated 32% compared with 11% in areas with child survival projects not using Core Groups.

 

Care Groups I: An Innovative Community-Based Strategy for Improving Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health in Resource-Constrained Settings

Care Groups use volunteers to motivate mothers to adopt key MCH behaviors. The volunteers meet as a group every 2-4 weeks with a paid facilitator to learn new health promotion messages. Key ingredients of the approach include: peer-to-peer health promotion, selection of volunteers by the mothers, a manageable workload for the volunteers (no more than 15 households per volunteer), frequent (at least monthly) contact between volunteers and mothers, and regular supervision of the volunteers. 

 

A Rough Guide to Community Engagement in Performance-Based Incentive Programs: With Lessons from Burundi, Indonesia, and Mexico

This guide aims to help policymakers and program managers assess whether engaging communities makes sense in the context of the performance-based incentive (PBI) programs they support; determine what is the best approach or mechanism for such engagement; and how to mitigate the risks. PBI, as with bottom-up social accountability mechanisms, aims to fix broken accountability relationships by providing payers of health services tools to hold providers accountable through provision of incentives for verified increases in the quantity and quality of health services.

Acceptability and trust of community health workers offering material and newborn health education in rural Uganda

When trusted, Community Health Workers (CHWs) can contribute to improving maternal and newborn health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries through education. Issues of acceptability of CHWs by communities were explored through experiences gained in a qualitative study that is part of a cluster randomized trial in East Uganda.

Addressing the social determinants of health: a case study from the Mitanin (community health worker) programme in India

The Mitanin Programme, a government community health worker (CHW) programme, was started in Chhattisgarh State of India in 2002. The CHWs (Mitanins) have consistently adopted roles that go beyond health programme- specific interventions to embrace community mobilization and action on local priorities. The aim of this research was to document how and why the Mitanins have been able to act on the social determinants of health, describing the catalysts and processes involved and the enabling programmatic and organizational factors.

Poor retention does not have to be the rule: retention of volunteer community health workers in Uganda

Globally, health worker shortages continue to plague developing countries. Community health workers are increasingly being promoted to extend primary health care to underserved populations. Since 2004, Healthy Child Uganda (HCU) has trained volunteer community health workers in child health promotion in rural southwest Uganda. This study analyses the retention and motivation of volunteer community health workers trained by HCU. It presents retention rates over a 5-year period and provides insight into volunteer motivation.

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CHW Central is managed by Initiatives Inc. Site start-up was supported by the USAID Health Care Improvement Project in 2011.

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